Menu
header photo

Creation Science Fiction™

Exposing The Lies One Layer At A Time

The Importance Of Lucy As A Human Ancestor Confirmed Again

A new paper published in Science Advances confirms that it is not likely that Australopithecus sediba from South Africa was ancestral to the Genus Homo, but was the result of a population that evolved in a different direction about 2 million years ago.  I have long believed this was the case based on the anatomic traits mentioned in the paper and so have most paleoanthropologists, but Dr. Lee Berger who discovered the fossil was holding out. The following is from an article at Phys.org.

"Alemseged and Du maintain that Australopithecus afarensisis a better candidate for the direct  of Homo for a number of reasons. A. afarensis fossils have been dated up to three million years old, nearing the age of the first Homo jaw. Lucy and her counterparts, including Selam, the fossil of an A. afarensis child that Alemseged discovered in 2000, were found in Ethiopia, just miles from where the Homo jaw was discovered. The jaw's features also resemble those of A. afarensis closely enough that one could make the case it was a direct descendant.

"Given the timing, geography and morphology, these three pieces of evidence make us think afarensisis a better candidate than sediba," Alemseged said. "One can disagree about morphology and the different features of a fossil, but the level of confidence we can put in the mathematical and statistical analyses of the chronological data in this paper makes our argument a very strong one."

It seems as though just like we often see today there were several unique species evolving in Southern Africa slightly different than their counterparts in the central region and other parts of the continent. Australopithecus sediba could have given rise to a species like Homo naledi or a similar yet undiscovered species, but wasn't in the lineage that led to our species. No response yet that I have seen from Lee Berger or John Hawks, both of whom had suggested sediba may have been a more direct link. 

Go Back

Comment